The idea of comfort zones has been around for eternity. However, it doesn’t mean we need them. Sometimes it’s best to seek discomfort.

Podcast

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Transcript

The problem with comfort zones is that we get comfortable.

Since I moved out of my apartment, I've realised what I was doing back when I had my apartment was and being a bit too comfortable. I was getting my work done, I was seeing friends, and I was doing stuff that wasn't actually a problem, but I found myself in too much of a comfort zone, and I couldn't get out of it.

As you know, I've been on the road for the past three months living on the road, living in the car, living in different houses, and I love it even though I'm 'uncomfortable', uncomfortable in the sense that I'm not actually uncomfortable but I'm not in any comfort zone, I'm getting a lot more done, my mind is way more active, I see lots of new things, I'm learning lots of new things, fixing things and managing life in a completely different way.

The fact that I was stagnant was impeding my work, impeding my thought processes, and impeding the way I worked with my clients. Now, I'm way freer.

When I work with clients, I've noticed that they're in their comfort zone with their technology, the apps that they use and the way that they've been taught how to use their computers and email etc.

Getting out of our comfort zone is when we learn, when we do understand more when we do research the things that we actually want to do.

Because even though comfort zones are nice, it's a nicety, but they are not necessary, and they are detrimental to your mental health, to your mental well-being, to your understanding of other things.

So getting out of your comfort zone, I think it's probably one of the best things you could do. It works for many, it's worked for me, and I can't imagine going back to that comfort zone.